“Love Them Enough To Let Them Go”

Two of my children moved across the country, and people always ask me how I manage missing them and not having them home for every holiday. My answer is this: I love themkids1 enough to let them go.

I’ve learned a thing or two raising five kids in the last 28 years and learning to let them go without a struggle, or  too many tears, or guilt is one of the biggest ones.

No one said it was easy, but it does get easier as you learn how to do it and I’ll tell you this, my kids are thankful that I’ve learned how to do it. My one son told me that he couldn’t do “at home” what he could accomplish across the country. He told me that the best thing I did for him was to let him go and do it on his own. And he did, and I’m so proud of him for it.

What I had to learn is that as much as I want to protect them and shelter them from the craziness of the world, I can’t. They’ll never learn what they need to learn; they’ll never make mistakes that will become valuable lessons for them; and most importantly, they’ll never learn how to stand on their own and be strong.

I realized that I had to learn from my own mistakes and I shouldn’t interfere with their free will to do the same. It’s a simple concept, yet hard to do, but if you truly want the best for your child, you have to love them enough to let them go. And trust me, they always come back.

It’s a funny thing: love travels across the miles with them, and their love for me travels back. Love can’t be taken from them, love goes with them.

I didn’t learn this lesson overnight, as my oldest son would tell you, but as the years passed my faith in them increased. I knew I had taught them right from wrong, and one day they’d have to take all I taught them and do it on their own. And I’m proud to say that they’re all doing pretty well!

I see so many parents struggle with letting their kids go, enabling bad behaviors, doing everything for them that these kids grow into adults who don’t know how to do anything for themselves. They don’t know how to cook, clean, do laundry; they don’t know how to battle their own demons because someone does it for them. They don’t know how to grow up because someone won’t let them. They don’t know how to take responsibility for their actions because someone is always making excuses for them.

And that’s the worst thing you could do to your child.

kids2I’ve been a mom for almost 28 years and have loved every minute of it (well, most every minute of it!) It was so much easier when they were younger and thought everything we said was truth; when we could simply kiss a boo-boo and make it go away; that loving them was enough for them.

And then they grow older and challenge what we say; broken hearts replace simple boo-boo’s that we can’t kiss away; and loving them suddenly doesn’t seem like enough. They want our love, yet they also want the freedom to live their life the way they want to, not the way we had hoped.

They want the right to do it on their own, learn their own lessons, and make their own mistakes, and if you can’t love them enough to let them go, they’ll do all those things but come crying back to you to fix it when it goes wrong…and you can’t do that. Why?

Because then you become an enabler, and an enabler does so because they can’t control their own life, and if you really love your child, why would you enable them? Why would you enable their bad behavior? Why would you enable them to stay dependent on you?

I know, it’s a slippery slope, but I know from my own experience as a parent that the best thing I could have ever done for my kids is to “love them enough to let them go;” love them enough to live their life the way they want; love them enough to make their own mistakes and learn from them.

I miss my  three older kids who are scattered throughout the country, but I know they’re happy, living their dreams, and doing well. And isn’t that what any parent wants?

I’d rather take the hurt of missing them than put guilt on them for living far away.

As long as they’re happy, I’m happy.

And they were very happy that I was the kind of mom who could “love them enough to let them go.”

Wishing you love and light,

~Anne Dennish~

“Then and Now”

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6 thoughts on ““Love Them Enough To Let Them Go”

  1. Rather than telling people WHAT to do, simply humble yourself and talk about YOUR experiences, YOUR mistakes, YOUR failings….let others discover their own “a-Ha” moments. Self-professed “gurus” are so obvious.

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    • Obviously I hit a nerve with you. I am a writer who shares her experiences in life with others’ in the hopes that they will realize they’re not alone. I’m extremely careful how I phrase things, and I don’t feel like I told anyone what to do, and I am not a self-processed guru, just a single mom of five kids and a breast cancer survivor. I learned through my mistakes and consciously choose to write about them and share the lessons I learned. You seemed to have judged me based on one of my stories, calling me a self-professed “guru,” which I do not profess to be. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with sharing an experience, the lesson I learned, and how I got through it, simply to help someone. Thank you for your response, albeit not very kind, yet as a writer, it’s always a pleasure to move someone, even if it’s not a nice one. Have a wonderful day…but that’s up to you! ❤

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      • As a writer, you should reflect upon your impact on others. I would hope that the goal would be to inspire, not to sound preachy, which is my perspective if what you have chosen to share on the Internet. No need to be defensive….remember, if you put it out there, you have to be receptive to other’s opinions of your work. Wishing you love and light, as well.
        CR

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      • I’m receptive to others’ opinions and so should they be of mine. My goal as a writer and human being is to always inspire and be kind. And I wasn’t being defensive, I was standing up for myself because I was judged wrongly, yet that’s your opinion, and this is mine. Have a wonderful day.

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  2. Examples of preaching and judging others in an incredibly generalized manner:

    “I see so many parents struggle with letting their kids go, enabling bad behaviors, doing everything for them that these kids grow into adults who don’t know how to do anything for themselves. They don’t know how to cook, clean, do laundry; they don’t know how to battle their own demons because someone does it for them. They don’t know how to grow up because someone won’t let them. They don’t know how to take responsibility for their actions because someone is always making excuses for them.”

    ANOTHER EXAMPLE:

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